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1908 Emma Farm Association

Isaac Kaufmann (1851-1921) immigrated to Pittsburgh from Germany in 1869.  He joined his brother who had arrived a year earlier, and joined with him in operating a small men's clothing store on Pittsburgh's South Side.  They were soon joined by two other brothers, and together they developed the business into one of Pittsburgh's largest department stores, known as Kaufmann's.  The store was located in downtown Pittsburgh. 

Corinne Azen Krause Photographs, Rauh Jewish Archives at the Heinz History Center

 
1864 Hebrew Benevolent Society

Hebrew Benevolent Society president Abraham Lippman (1838-1910) was a successful dry goods merchant who dedicated much of his life to Jewish charitable causes in Pittsburgh.  In 1909, under Lippman's leadership, the Hebrew Benevolent Society filled 950 grocery orders, delivered 4000 bushels of coal, and distributed over $5000 to those in need. 

Rauh Jewish Archives at the Heinz History Center 

 
1874 Cremeiux Society

Lippman Mayer (1841-1904) served as the first ordained rabbi at Rodef Shalom Congregation from 1870 to 1901.  A German immigrant, Rabbi Mayer served as director of the Hebrew Benevolent Society and founded a school for Russian and Eastern European Jewish immigrants and Pittsburgh's first public kindergarten.

Courtesy of Rodef Shalom Congregation Archives

 
1856 Rodef Shalom

"He was connected with all charitable undertakings in Pittsburgh, particularly those ministering to the poor Jew; was it in sorrow or was in joy--on every occasion Josiah Cohen was present."  Jewish Criterion, May 31, 1918

Photograph of Josiah Cohen (1841-1930) who came to Pittsburgh in 1860 as the English teacher for Rodef Shalom's school and became one of the congregation's most active members.  A teacher, lawyer, and later judge, he was devoted to Jewish education and philanthropy throughout his life. 

Richard E. Rauh Photographs, Rauh Jewish Archives at the Heinz History Center

 
1840 First Jewish families begin to settle in Pittsburgh

Jacob and Lena Klee, photographed in Pittsburgh, c.1860.  Jacob Klee came to Pittsburgh from Germany in 1847.  The Klees settled in Allegheny City, now Pittsburgh's North Side, where they owned a retail clothing business and raised a large family.

Frank Family Photographs, Rauh Jewish Archives at the Heinz History Center

 
1871 Kaufmann's Department Store

Photograph of the four founding Kaufmann brothers and their wives, c.1890.  (top row, left to right) Jacob Kaufmann, Henry Kaufmann, Morris Kaufmann, and Isaac Kaufmann.  (bottom row, left to right) Augusta Kaufmann, Theresa Kaufmann, Betty Kaufmann,  and Emma Kaufmann.

Kaufmann Wolf Families Photographs, Rauh Jewish Archives at the Heinz History Center

 
1897 Emma Kaufmann Clinic

Photograph of the four Kaufmann brothers, founders of Kaufmann's Department Store, and their wives, c.1890.  (Top row, left to right) Jacob Kaufmann, Henry Kaufmann, Morris Kaufmann, and Isaac Kaufmann.  (Bottom row, left to right) Augusta Kaufmann, Theresa Kaufmann, Betty Kaufmann, Emma Kaufmann.

Kaufmann and Wolf Family Photographs, Rauh Jewish Archives at the Heinz History Center

 
1896 Columbian Council School

Rabbi Lippman Mayer (1841- 1904), a German immigrant, served as rabbi at the Rodef Shalom Congregation from 1870 until 1901.  Deeply devoted to education and learning, he helped establish free kindergarten programs with the Christian, German-speaking community in Pittsburgh and offered free lectures for recent Jewish immigrants in the basement of the synagogue.  Recognizing the need for English language skills among the many Eastern European immigrants coming to Pittsburgh, Rabbi Mayer opened the Russian School in 1882 to teach English to Yiddish-speaking immigrants.  Rabbi Mayer's school merged with the Columbian School in 1899.

Courtesy of the Rodef Shalom Congregation Archives

 
1926 Isaac Seder Education Center

Isaac Seder (c.1874-1924), Pittsburgh, Pa., c.1910.  Isaac Seder immigrated to Pittsburgh about 1885.  As a young man, he entered the wholesale clothing industry.  He later partnered with Jacob Frank, and together they founded a successful department store, Frank and Seder, in Pittsburgh's downtown.  Isaac Seder and his wife, Gertrude, donated to several Jewish organizations throughout their lives, including Montefiore Hospital, Jewish Home for the Aged, and the Young Men and Women's Hebrew Association.

Seder Family Photographs, Rauh Jewish Archives at the Heinz History Center

 
1880 United Hebrew Relief Association

Rosalie Rauh (1833-1915) served as vice president of the United Hebew Relief Association and as a member of the Association's Investigating Committee which evaluated the needs, living conditions, and well-being of members of the local Jewish community.

Richard E. Rauh Photographs, Rauh Jewish Archives at the Heinz History Center

 
1905 First Warsaw Benevolent Society

Anna and Isadore Zeidenschneider, Pittsburgh, Pa., 1906.  Anna Zeidenschneider arrived from Lublin, Poland, to join her husband Isadore shortly before this photograph was taken.  After Isadore Zeidenschneider arrived in Pittsburgh with his two brothers, Max and Abraham, all trained as tailors, they turned to the Erste Washover Unterstitzungs Verein (First Warsaw Benevolent Society) for help in establishing themselves in America.  Isadore Zeidenschneider later became chairman of the benevolent society, assisting other Polish Jewish immigrants as he had been helped years earlier.

Louis Zeiden Photographs, Rauh Jewish Archives at the Heinz History Center

 
1905 First Warsaw Benevolent Society

Louis Zeiden, after becoming a bar mitzvah at the Shaare Zedeck Synagogue, 1927.  The Shaare Zedeck congregation was founded by Polish Jews living in Pittsburgh's Hill District.  Louis Zeiden's parents, both Polish Jewish immigrants, were active members of the synagogue and of the Erste Warshover Unterstitzungs Verein (First Warsaw Benevolent Society).

Louis Zeiden Photographs, Rauh Jewish Archives at the Heinz History Center

 
1865 Hebrew Ladies' Aid Society

Photographed here with three of her five children, Pauline Wormser Frank and her husband William Frank were among the first Jewish families to settle in Pittsburgh.   After volunteering with relief efforts during the Civil War, Pauline Frank founded the Hebrew Ladies' Aid Society with other women from Pittsburgh's Rodef Shalom Congregation.  On her 90th birthday in 1905, she was celebrated in the Jewish Criterion as having been "a broadminded, progressive, tolerant woman, whose labors on behalf of the unfortunate have known neither creed nor color."

Frank Family Photographs, Rauh Jewish Archives at the Heinz History Center

 
1911 B'nai Israel Congregation

Cantor Mordecai Heiser (c.1915-1989) served as cantor and music director of B'nai Israel Congregation for fifty years. 

B'nai Israel Congregation Photographs, Rauh Jewish Archives at the Heinz History Center

 
1862 B'nai B'rith Jericho Lodge

Josiah Cohen (1841-1930) founded Pittsburgh's first B'nai B'rith Lodge.

Richard E. Rauh Photographs, Rauh Jewish Archives at the Heinz History Center

 
1922 Bertha Floersheim Rauh

The Rauh family (from left) Bertha, Richard S., Enoch, and Helen B. Rauh, c.1900.

Richard E. Rauh Photographs, Rauh Jewish Archives at the Heinz History Center

 
1894 Columbian Council of Jewish Women

Pauline Hanauer Rosenburg, the first president of the Columbian Council of Jewish Women, c.1900.

Corinne Azen Krause Photographs, Rauh Jewish Archives at the Heinz History Center

 
1894 Columbian Council of Jewish Women

Bertha Floersheim Rauh (1865-1952), photographed here with her husband and child, helped to found the Columbian Council and served as its president from 1904 to 1919.  Her energetic volunteer efforts through the Columbian Council helped her move into local politics.  In 1922, she was appointed by Pittsburgh Mayor William A. Magee to serve as the city's Director of Public Charities, becoming the first women in the United States to serve in a mayor's cabinet.

Richard E. Rauh Photographs, Rauh Jewish Archives at the Heinz History Center

 
1871 Kaufmann's Department Store

Kaufmann's Department Store on Smithfield Street, between Fifth and Forbes Avenue, downtown Pittsburgh, c.1900

Kaufmann's Department Store Photographs, Rauh Jewish Archives at the Heinz History Center 

 
1888 Shaare Torah Congregation

Rabbi Baruch A. Poupko (c.1920-2010) served as rabbi of Shaare Torah Congregation for forty-five years, c.1950. 

Corinne Azen Krause Photographs, Rauh Jewish Archives at the Heinz History Center

 
1865 Hebrew Ladies' Aid Society

Described as "the most active volunteer" by the Jewish Criterion, Carrie Naumburg Cohen was a leader among the earliest Jewish women's charitable organizations, including the Hebrew Ladies' Aid Society.  Her father served as a cantor, reader, and teacher for the Rodef Shalom Congregation, and she married Josiah Cohen, Allegheny County's first Jewish judge.  Her charitable work often moved beyond the Jewish community.  She served on the Ladies' Auxiliary Committee of Pittsburgh Homeopathic Hospital, now Shadyside Hospital, along with the wives of George Westinghouse and Henry Clay Frick.

Richard E. Rauh Photographs, Rauh Jewish Archives at the Heinz History Center

 
1864 Tree of Life Congregation

Alexander Fink (1818-1892), a founding member and president of the Tree of Life Congregation from 1872 to 1892, c.1885.  Alexander Fink immigrated to the United States from Lithuania about 1845 and operated a dry goods business in New York and Pittsburgh.  In addition to his presidency of Tree of Life, Fink also served as president of the Hebrew Benevolent and Bes Almon societies.

Corinne Azen Krause Photographs, Rauh Jewish Archives at the Heinz History Center

 
1869 Beth Hamedrash Hagodol

Rabbi Aaron M. Ashinsky (c.1867 - 1954) was born in Lomza, in Russian Poland, and came to Pittsburgh in 1901.  He served as rabbi at the city's largest Orthodox congregation, Beth Hamedrash Hagodol in Pittsburgh's Hill District, and at several other smaller Orthodox congregations.  As an immigrant, he had a keen awareness of the needs of Jewish newcomers and also worked to help the elderly, the sick, and the impoverished.  A gifted fundraiser and a visionary leader, Rabbi Ashinsky helped establish the Jewish Home for the Aged, Hebrew Institute, Montefiore Hospital, and the Jewish Home for Babies and Children.

Corinne Krause Photographs, Rauh Jewish Archives at the Heinz History Center

 
1908 Emma Farm Association

Photograph of the four Kaufmann brothers, founders of Kaufmann's Department Store, and their wives, c.1890.  (top row, left to right) Jacob Kaufmann, Henry Kaufmann, Morris Kaufmann, and Isaac Kaufmann.  (bottom row, left to right) Augusta Kaufmann, Theresa Kaufmann, Betty Kaufmann, and Emma Kaufmann.

Kaufmann and Wolf Family Photographs, Rauh Jewish Archives at the Heinz

 
1865 Hebrew Ladies' Aid Society

This photograph of the Hebrew Ladies' Aid Society was taken in the 1870s on the steps of the Concordia Club, a Jewish social club in Allegheny City, now Pittsburgh's North Side, where many of Pittsburgh's wealthy German Jewish families lived.  Most of these families spoke both German and English and followed the Reform Jewish ritual at their synagogue, Rodef Shalom, then located on 8th Street in downtown Pittsburgh.  In 1880, this organization merged with the Hebrew Benevolent Society to help serve the needs of the many newly arriving Jewish immigrants who were fleeing persecution throughout the Russian Empire and Eastern Europe. 

Corinne Azen Krause Photographs, Rauh Jewish Archives at the Heinz History Center

 
1847 Bes Almon Society

William Frank (1819-1891) was among the founders of the Bes Almon Society.  His son was one of the first burials in the Society's cemetery.  William Frank and his wife, Pauline, were also founding members of the Rodef Shalom Congregation, the Hebrew Benevolent Association, and the Hebrew Ladies' Aid Society.

Frank Family Photographs, Rauh Jewish Archives at the Heinz History Center 

 
1920 Enoch Rauh Club

Enoch Rauh (1857-1919) was a senior partner of Rauh Brothers and Company, a men's clothing firm.  From 1911 to 1919, he served on Pittsburgh's city council where he authored the Rauh Act, legislation which protected workers' rights. He served as a board member of many Jewish and non-Jewish organizations, including Gusky Orphanage, the Young Men's Hebrew Association, the Carnegie Institute, and the Carnegie Library.

Richard E. Rauh Photographs, Rauh Jewish Archives at the Heinz History Center

 
1883 Beth Jacob

Rabbi Aaron M. Ashinsky (c.1867 - 1854) was born in Lomza, in Russian Poland, and came to Pittsburgh in 1901.  He served as rabbi at the city's largest Orthodox congregation, Beth Hamedrash Hagodol in Pittsburgh's Hill District and at several other smaller Orthodox congregations.  As an immigrant, he had a keen awareness of the needs of Jewish newcomers and worked to help the elderly, the sick, and the impoverished.  A gifted fundraiser and a visionary leader, Rabbi Ashinsky helped establish the Jewish Home for the Aged, Jewish Home for Babies and Children, the Hebrew Institute, and Montefiore Hospital. 

Corinne Azen Krause Photographs, Rauh Jewish Archives at the Heinz History Center

 
1922 Bertha Floersheim Rauh

Bertha and Enoch Rauh with their daughter Helen, 1891.

Richard E. Rauh Photographs, Rauh Jewish Archives at the Heinz History Center

 
1890 Tiphereth Israel Congregation

Rabbi Eliyahu W. Kochin (1870-1946) of Tiphereth Israel Congregation, c.1930.  Rabbi Kochin was born in Kovna, Lithuania, and immigranted to Pittsburgh about 1906.  He served as rabbi of Tiphereth Israel for nearly forty years and founded a school for religious and Hebrew instruction known as the Hebrew Religious Academy in Pittsburgh's Hill District.

Corinne Azen Krause Photographs, Rauh Jewish Archives at the Heinz History Center

 
1883 House of Shelter

Stogie workers in Pittsburgh's Hill District, 1907.  For the new immigrants staying at the Pittsburgh House of Shelter, finding work was the first step in establishing a life in America.  Arriving immigrants were often hired as unskilled laborers in small factories or stores.  Many young women found work in the cigar or "stogie" factories located in Pittsburgh's Hill District.

Courtesy of New York Public Library

 
1883 House of Shelter

Located on Locust Street in Pittsburgh's Hill District, the House of Shelter provided temporary lodging for "poor immigrants and deserted wives and children." 

Corinne Azen Krause Photographs, Rauh Jewish Archives at the Heinz History Center

 
1871 Kaufmann's Department Store

In 1909, Henry Kaufmann (1860-1955) and his wife Theresa were asked to help fund a larger, professionally-staffed settlement house, to take the place of the overcrowded Columbian Council School and Settlement, a volunteer-run facility, which served the growing number of immigrants living in Pittsburgh's Hill District.  In memory of their daughter Irene, the Kaufmanns donated $150,000 for the construction of the settlement building on Centre Avenue and $40,000 toward an endowment. Known as the Irene Kaufmann Settlement, the building became the center of neighborhood life in the Hill District and one of the country's largest and most successful settlement houses.

Irene Kaufmann Settlement Photographs, Rauh Jewish Archives at the Heinz History Center

 
1899 New Light (Ohr Chodesh) Congregation

Members of the Oher Chodesh congregation in Pittsburgh's Hill District, 1924.

New Light (Oher Chodesh) Congregation Photographs, Rauh Jewish Archives at the Heinz History Center

 
1898 Hebrew Ladies' Hospital Aid Society

Annie Jacobs Davis (bottom right), president and founder of the Hebrew Ladies' Hospital Aid Society, with family and friends during a fundraising event.  Davis holds a cigar box filled with donations collected for the building of Montefiore Hospital.

Montefiore Hospital Photographs, Rauh Jewish Archives at the Heinz History Center

 
1864 Tree of LIfe Congregation

Joseph Levin (c.1865-1947), Bellaire, Ohio, c. 1885.  Joseph Levin was born in Grodno, Russian, about 1865.  After studying music in Russia, Levin emigrated to the United States as a young man.  He settled in Ohio where he served as a cantor to several Jewish congregations, then moved to Pittsburgh in 1902.  In that year, he bacame cantor of the Tree of Life Congregation, a position he held for thirty-eight years.

Joseph Levin Photographs, Rauh Jewish Archives at the Heinz History Center

 
1923 Southwestern District of Pennsylvania Jewish Religious Schools

Miriam Schonfield (1887-1934), c.1925. At age twelve, Miriam Schonfield volunteered as a teacher for the religion classes of the Columbian Council School in Pittsburgh's Hill District. 

Schonfield helped to expand the Council's religious school programs, which later became known as the Southwestern District of Pennsylvania Jewish Religious Schools.  She served as director for nearly 25 years until her death in 1934. 

Miriam Schonfield Photographs, Rauh Jewish Archives at the Heinz History Center

 
1887 Hebrew Free Loan Society

Officers of the Hebrew Free Loan Society, 1946. Standing are (left to right) Emanuel Spector, Abe Weil, Harry Seiner, Louis Abramowitz, Meyer Fineberg, and Fred Gluck. Seated are (left to right) Joseph Goldstein, Israel Oseroff, and Samuel Goldstock.

Hebrew Free Loan Society Photographs, Rauh Jewish Archives at the Heinz History Center

 
1980 Holocaust Center of the Jewish Federation of Greater Pittsburgh

Photograph of Shulamit Bastacky, president of the Holocaust Survivors Organization of Pittsburgh, lighting a memorial candle at the annual Yom Hashoah (Holocaust Remembrance Day) service at the state capital in Harrisburg, Pennsylvania, April 30, 1987.

United Jewish Federation Photographs, Rauh Jewish Archives at the Heinz History Center

 
1924 Jewish National Fund Pittsburgh Council

Henry Ellenbogen (1900-1985), the president of the Pittsburgh and Tri-State Council of the Jewish National Fund for twenty-five years, served as a United States congressman and then as a judge of the Allegheny County Court of Common Pleas.

Henry Ellenbogen Photographs, Rauh Jewish Archives at the Heinz History Center

 
1887 Hebrew Free Loan Society

Simon Shupinsky, considered the founder of the Hebrew Free Loan Society, c.1900.

Corinne Azen Krause Photographs, Rauh Jewish Archives at the Heinz History Center

 
1979 New Americans Resettlement Committee

English language classes organized by the New Americans Resettlement Committee of the United Jewish Federation of Greater Pittsburgh, 1979.

United Jewish Federation of Greater Pittsburgh Photographs, Rauh Jewish Archives at the Heinz History Center

 
1885 Pittsburgh Platform

Concordia Club, 45 Stockton Street, Allegheny City (Pittsburgh's North Side), c.1890.

Corinne Azen Krause Photographs, Rauh Jewish Archives at the Heinz History Center

 
1910 Labor Lyceum

A ticket for the annual outing of the Labor Lyceum, 1909.

Pittsburgh Labor Lyceum, Rauh Jewish Archives at the Heinz History Center

 
1908 Montefiore Hospital

Katherine Bauman Blank, member of the first class of nurses to graduate from the Montefiore Hospital Training School for Nurses, 1910.

Montefiore Hospital Photographs, Rauh Jewish Archives at the Heinz History Center

 
1869 Beth Hamedrash Hagodol

The Jewish population of Pittsburgh's Hill District began to shift in the 1920s.  Many Jewish immigrants had built businesses and careers that enabled them to leave the crowded Hill District for the more affluent neighborhoods in Pittsburgh's East End.  A number of the synagogues that had been founded in the Hill District moved with their congregations, but two of the largest Orthodox congregations, Beth Hamedrash Hagodol and Beth Jacob, stayed in the Hill District.  They eventually merged, and, known as Beth Hamedrash Hagodol-Beth Jacob, built a new synagogue on Colwell Street in 1965.     

Corinne Azen Krause Photographs, Rauh Jewish Archives at the Heinz History Center

 
1936 Friendship Club

Members of the Friendship Club packing donated supplies for soldiers serving in World War II, 1942.

Corinne Azen Krause Photographs, Rauh Jewish Archives at the Heinz History Center

 
1883 House of Shelter

Jacob Radbord baking matzah at Caplan's Bakery in Pittsburgh's Hill District, c.1930.  Food, bedding, and clothing were donated to the House of Shelter by many individuals and businesses.  Caplan's Bakery donated fresh bread, and the United Hebrew Relief Association purchased the coal needed to heat the home.

Elbling Family Photographs, Rauh Jewish Archives at the Heinz History Center

 
1891 Gusky Home and Orphanage

Esther and Jacob M. Gusky arrived in Pittsburgh from New York City at the close of the Civil War.  Jacob Gusky opened a small clothing store in Pittsburgh's downtown.  As Pittsburgh's population and wealth grew after the war, so too did the business, which became one of Pittsburgh's largest department stores.  Esther Gusky, along with her brother, Levi DeWolf, managed the store after Jacob's Gusky's death in 1886.  Esther Gusky left their home in Pittsburgh's North Side and moved to this mansion on Bellefonte Street and Fifth Avenue in 1891.

Library and Archives at the Heinz History Center

 
1911 Irene Kaufmann Settlement House

An Irene Kaufmann Settlement visiting nurse and patient in the Hill District, c.1920.

Irene Kaufmann Settlement Photographs, Rauh Jewish Archives at the Heinz History Center

 
1911 Irene Kaufmann Settlement House

Evening classes for immigrants at the Irene Kaufmann Settlement, 1921.

United Jewish Federation Photographs, Rauh Jewish Archives at the Heinz History Center

 
1887 Hebrew Free Loan Society

Members of the Hebrew Free Loan Society reviewing applications at the Irene Kaufmann Settlement House, c.1920.

Irene Kaufmann Settlement Photographs, Rauh Jewish Archives at the Heinz History Center

 
1944 Maimonides Institute

Rabbi Wolf Leiter (1892-1974) founder of the Maimonides Institute, Pittsburgh, Pa., 1944.

Jewish Criterion, December 8, 1944

 
1926 Isaac Seder Education Center

Frank and Seder Department Store, Fifth Avenue and Smithfield Street, downtown Pittsburgh, c.1925.  Isaac Seder, a Russian immigrant, and his partner, Jacob Frank, opened their department store in 1907.  In later years, with the success of their Pittsburgh store, the partners expanded and opened stores in New York, Philadelphia, and Detroit.  By 1954, however, with the rise of suburban shopping malls, the department store and its branch locations were closed.

Seder Family Photographs, Rauh Jewish Archives at the Heinz History Center

 
1864 Tree of Life Congregation

Portrait of Joseph Levin (c.1865-1947) by Samuel Rosenberg, c.1940.  Joseph Levin served as cantor for the Tree of Life Congregation from 1902 to 1938.

Joseph Levin Photographs, Rauh Jewish Archives at the Heinz History Center

 
1936 Friendship Club

Members of the Friendship Club Ladies' Auxiliary, 1960.

Ernest Nachman Photographs, Rauh Jewish Archives at the Heinz History Center

 
1979 New Americans Resettlement Committee

New Americans Resettlement Committee dance for Soviet Jewish immigrants, 1981.

United Jewish Federation Photographs, Rauh Jewish Archives at the Heinz History Center

 
1895 Columbian Council's Sisterhood of Personal Service

The Columbian Council's first program for adult immigrants was their Sisterhood of Personal Service.  Volunteers from the Columbian Council visited the homes of immigrant families, assessed their level of need, and helped them learn ways in which they could rise out of poverty.  The program continued as one of the many services provided by the Irene Kaufmann Settlement House.

Irene Kaufmann Settlement Papers, Rauh Jewish Archives at the Heinz History Center

 

 
1924 Pittsburgher Rebbe

The pushke, or collection, cup used to collect small donations for the Pittsburgh Hasidic dynasty founded in Pittsburgh by Rabbi Yosef Leifer in 1924.

Gift of Evelyn Blum 

 
1888 Shaare Torah Congregation

Rabbi Moses Shimon Sivitz (1854-1936), the first rabbi of Shaare Torah Congregation and considered Pittsburgh's first Orthodox rabbi, c.1915.

Corinne Azen Krause Photographs, Rauh Jewish Archives at the Heinz History Center

 
1971 Pittsburgh Conference on Soviet Jewry

The Freedom Bus, a project of the American Zionist Youth Foundation, visiting Pittsburgh, 1971.  The Freedom Bus toured several American cities in November of 1971 to raise awareness about the struggles of Soviet Jews. 

United Jewish Federation of Greater Pittsburgh Photographs, Rauh Jewish Archives at the Heinz History Center

 
1871 Kaufmann's Department Store

Oliver Kaufmann (on left) (1898-1980), vice-president of Kaufmann's Department store and a veteran of both world wars, honoring his employees who served in the Armed Forces, June 1946.

Edgar J. Kaufmann Charitable Foundation Photographs, Rauh Jewish Archives at the Heinz History Center

 
1856 Rodef Shalom

Photograph of Rodef Shalom's 1901 synagogue on Eighth Street in downtown Pittsburgh.  The original synagogue was built in 1862 on the same location, but was replaced by this structure when the original building became too small.  The congregation continued to grow, and in 1907 a new synagogue was completed on Fifth Avenue in Pittsburgh's Oakland neighborhood, where it continues today as Pittsburgh's largest Reform Jewish congregation.

Corinne  Azen Krause Photographs, Rauh Jewish Archives at the Heinz History Center

 
1907 B'nai Zion Congregation

Storefront of Samuel Silberstein's tinware business on Hamilton Avenue in the Pittsburgh neighborhood of Homewood, c.1900.  Samuel Silberstein (1865-1932) immigrated to Pittsburgh from Vienna, Austria, in 1878 and settled in the Homewood neighborhood with his wife, Sara, and their children.  The Silbersteins were the first Jewish family to settle in Homewood and would have traveled out of the neighborhood to attend synagogue.

Reizenstein Family Photographs, Rauh Jewish Archives at the Heinz History Center

 
1975 Israeli War Wounded Project

Photograph of Israeli war veterans on their visit to Pittsburgh through the Israeli War Wounded Project, 1975.  (seated left to right) Zeev Heffner, Yacov Israel, Aminadav Eilat, Yuval Ginat, (standing left to right) David Hannan, Pinhas Kuperman, Zvi Weber, Ron Haddad, 1975.

Jewish Chronicle Photographs, Rauh Jewish Archives at the Heinz History Center

 
1880 United Hebrew Relief Association

Alexander Fink (1818-1892) served as the first president of the United Hebrew Relief Society.

Corinne Azen Krause Photographs, Rauh Jewish Archives at the Heinz History Center

 
1885 Talmud Torah

Rabbi Moses Shimon Sivitz (1854-1936), Pittsburgh, Pa., c.1900.  Rabbi Sivitz, considered Pittsburgh's first Orthodox rabbi, immigrated to Pittsburgh from Lithuania in the mid-1880s and served as rabbi of the Shaaray Torah congregation.  About 1885, Rabbi Sivitz opened the Talmud Torah on Wylie Avenue near Tunnel Street in Pittsburgh's Hill District. 

Corinne Azen Krause Photographs, Rauh Jewish Archives at the Heinz History Center

 
1933 Jewish War Veterans Post 49

Harry H. Schaffer (left) and Brigadier General John T. Hines (right) visit President Franklin D. Roosevelt at the White House to discuss veterans' affairs, June 8, 1943.

Courtesy of the Library of Congress

 
1979 New Americans Resettlement Committee

One of several instructional programs for Soviet Jews supported by the New Americans Resettlement Committee of the United Jewish Federation of Greater Pittsburgh, c.1979.

United Jewish Federation of Greater Pittsburgh Photographs, Rauh Jewish Archives at the Heinz History Center

 
1896 Columbian Council School

Soon after the Columbian Council was established, Cassie Weil, the wife of A. Leo Weil, led an effort to start a small religious school.  The program soon expanded to include classes in English for new immigrants and various evening classes for working adults.  In 1897, the Columbian School held classes at this location at 32 Townsend Street in Pittsburgh's Hill District.

Corinne Azen Krause Photographs, Rauh Jewish Archives at the Heinz History Center

 
1906 Jewish Home for the Aged

Rabbi Aaron M. Ashinsky (c.1867-1954) was born in Lomza, in Russian Poland, and came to Pittsburgh in 1901.  He served as rabbi to the city's largest Orthodox congregation, Beth Hamedrash Hagodol in Pittsburgh's Hill District and at several other smaller Orthodox congregations. As an immigrant, he had a keen awareness of the needs of Jewish newcomers and also worked to help the elderly, the sick, and the impoverished.  A gifted fundraiser and a visionary leader, Rabbi Ashinsky was a founder of many lasting Jewish organizations including the Jewish Home for the Aged. 

Corinne Azen Krause Photographs, Rauh Jewish Archives at the Heinz History Center

 
1918 Lechem Aniyum Society

Freda Filner (on right) and a friend, c.1930.  Freda Filner and her husband owned Filner's Bakery on Centre Avenue in Pittsburgh's Hill District.  Mrs. Filner's cakes were "famous throughout Lodz and Bendive, Poland, in the years before the war." (Jewish Criterion)  Mrs. Filner donated baked goods from the bakery each week to the Lechem Aniyum Society.

Corinne Azen Krause Photographs, Rauh Jewish Archives at the Heinz History Center

 
1999 Rauh Jewish Archives

Richard E. Rauh, 2009.  Rauh’s philanthropy has encompassed both the Jewish community and the Pittsburgh theater and cultural arena.  Among his endowments have been the dedication of the Rauh Jewish Archives at the Heinz History Center; the Richard E. Rauh Oral History Fund with the National Council of Jewish Women; the Helen Wayne Rauh Studio Theater at Carnegie Mellon University; the Rauh Theatre at the Pittsburgh Playhouse of Point Park College; the Helen Wayne Rauh Rehearsal Hall at the O’Reilly Theater; and the Richard S. Rauh Garden Room at Heinz Hall.

Richard E. Rauh Photographs, Rauh Jewish Archives at the Heinz History Center

 

 
1910 Labor Lyceum

Hebrew Bakers' Union strike in 1932.  The Bakers' Union, one of the few Pittsburgh Jewish labor unions, met at the Labor Lyceum before it closed in 1930.

Corinne Azen Krause Photographs, Rauh Jewish Archives at the Heinz History Center

 
1963 Anathan House

Bessie Frank Anathan (1885-1976), c.1900.

Corinne Azen Krause Photographs, Rauh Jewish Archives at the Heinz History Center

 
1908 Montefiore Hospital

Operating room nurse at Montefiore Hospital, c.1915.

Montefiore Hospital Photographs, Rauh Jewish Archvies at the Heinz History Center

 
1916 Young People's Zionist League

Rabbi Aaron M. Ashinsky (c.1867 - 1954) came to Pittsburgh to serve as rabbi to Beth Hamedrash Hagadol, an Orthodox synagogue in Pittsburgh's Hill District.  Rabbi Ashinsky helped establish many local Zionist groups including the Zionist Institute, which opened in 1903, the Young People's Zionist League, and the Zionist District of Pittsburgh, which began in 1918.  Rabbi Ashinsky was a founding member of the national Mizrachi Zionist Organization, a group that connected Jewish religious ideals with the political actions of Zionism.  

Corinne Azen Krause Photographs, Rauh Jewish Archives at the Heinz History Center

 
1894 Columbian Council of Jewish Women

Soon after the Columbian Council was established, Cassie (Mrs. A. Leo) Weil led an effort to start a small religious school.  The program soon expanded to include evening classes in English for new immigrants.  In 1897, the Columbian School held classes at this location at 37 Townsend Street in Pittsburgh's Hill District.

Corinne Azen Krause Photographs, Rauh Jewish Archives at the Heinz History Center

 
1894 Columbian Council of Jewish Women

Children's health and welfare were principal concerns for the members of the Columbian Council.  Early efforts of Council volunteers provided immigrant families with home health care visits and instruction on infant care and nutrition.

Irene Kaufmann Settlement Photographs, Rauh Jewish Archives at the Heinz History Center

 
1891 Gusky Home and Orphanage

Jacob M. Gusky, c.1880

Widely known for his generosity, Jacob Gusky donated much of his fortune to those in need.  Having lost his own father at a young age, Jacob Gusky often gave to orphans and widows throughout Pittsburgh.  He donated an elephant known as "Gusky" to a small zoo in Schenley Park and gave presents to his employees at Christmas.  After his untimely death in 1886, his obituary stated that, "...While blessed with affluence and success, he did not forget the sufferings of the needy poor.  He heard their appeals and paused in his business to respond."

Corinne Azen Krause Photographs, Rauh Jewish Archives at the Heinz History Center

 
1908 Pliskover Free Loan Association

Jewish refugees from Pliskov after their arrival in Romania, where aid from the Pliskover Free Loan Association was distributed, 1921.

Courtesy of the University of Pittsburgh Archives

 
1939 Jewish Community Relations Council

Lillian Friedberg (1897-1978) served as executive director of the Jewish Community Relations Council from 1943 to 1978.  She was a founder of the Allegheny County Council on Civil Rights and was an active member of Hadassah, Pittsburgh Chapter, and the National Council of Jewish Women, Pittsburgh Section. 

Corinne Azen Krause Photographs, Rauh Jewish Archives at the Heinz History Center

 
1864 Tree of Life Congregation

Isaac and Gertrude Seder, Pittsburgh, c.1930.  Isaac Seder immigrated to Pittsburgh about 1885 from Russian and entered into the clothing industry.  He later formed a partnership with Jacob H. Frank, and together they established the successful Frank and Seder department stores.  Isaac Seder served as trustee of the Tree of Life Congregation.

Seder Family Photographs, Rauh Jewish Archives at the Heinz History Center

 
1922 Bertha Floersheim Rauh

Bertha F. Rauh (1865-1952), c.1945.

Richard E. Rauh Photographs, Rauh Jewish Archives at the Heinz History Center

 
1978 Western Pennsylvania Auxiliary for Exceptional People

Rabbi Moshe Goldblum (1920-2011) served as rabbi for the Beth Shalom congregation from 1962 to 1987. He assumed the responsibilities of chaplain for the Western Pennsylvania Auxiliary for Exceptional People after Rabbi Leib Heber’s death in 1987.

Jewish Chronicle Photographs, Rauh Jewish Archives at the Heinz History Center

 
1911 B'nai Israel Congregation

Rabbi Benjamin Lichter (1886-1963) served as rabbi to the B'nai Israel Congregation from 1919 until his death in 1963.  He was active in many Zionist causes and served as president of the Pittsburgh Synagogue Council and chaplain for the Jewish War Veterans posts in Pittburgh.

B'nai Israel Congregation Photographs, Rauh Jewish Archives at the Heinz History Center

 
1936 Friendship Club

Passover seder for members of the Friendship Club, 1952.

Corinne Azen Krause Photographs, Rauh Jewish Archives at the Heinz History Center

 
1936 Friendship Club

A children's Hanukkah celebration sponsored by the Friendship Club, c.1950.

Ernest Nachman Photographs, Rauh Jewish Archives at the Heinz History Center

 
1911 Irene Kaufmann Settlement House

New immigrants learn English and become familiar with American culture in classes offered at the Irene Kaufmann Settlement, September 1931.

Irene Kaufmann Settlement Photographs, Rauh Jewish Archives at the Heinz History Center

 
1926 Isaac Seder Education Center

Gertrude Friedberg Seder (1883-1987), Pittsburgh, Pa., c.1910.  Gertrude Seder married Isaac Seder in 1904.  The couple owned the successful department store, Frank and Seder, in downtown Pittsburgh, and gave generously throughout their lives to local Jewish organizations and institutions. 

Seder Family Photographs, Rauh Jewish Archives at the Heinz History Center

 
1922 Bertha Floersheim Rauh

Bertha and Enoch Rauh, c.1919.

Richard E. Rauh Photographs, Rauh Jewish Archives at the Heinz History Center

 
1864 Hebrew Benevolent Society

Alexander Fink (1818-1892) was a founding member of the the Hebrew Benevolent Society and served as its president for twenty years. 

Corinne Azen Krause Photographs, Rauh Jewish Archives at the Heinz History Center

 
1891 Gusky Home and Orphanage

Advertisement for Gusky's Department Store, 1891.

Aggressive advertising and a dedication to good service contributed to the success of the Gusky Department Store, which spanned an entire block on Market Street in downtown Pittsburgh.  In 1904, however, the store fell into bankruptcy and closed, due in part to Esther Gusky's generosity with the family's fortune.

Library and Archives at the Heinz History Center

 
1897 Emma Kaufmann Clinic

Kaufmann's Department Store, Pittsburgh, Pa., c.1900.

Kaufmann Department Store Photographs, Rauh Jewish Archives at the Heinz History Center.

 

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